css.php

Queens College, Fall 2016

HISTORY

History 114 – History of the Jewish People I – Staff
Class #: 42168 – Mo, We – 9:15am-10:30am – KY 417 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
The ancient period. Emphasis on the interpretation of literary and archaeological evidence in light of modern scholarship. (Perspectives: meets PI)

History 115 – History of the Jewish People II – Prof. Bregoli
Class #: 41916 – Tu,Th – 12:15pm-1:30pm – PH 156 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
The Jewish Middle Ages from the decline of the Palestinian center to the beginnings of civic emancipation (ca. 200 A.D. to 1789).

History 255: VT: Transformational Moments in the Arab/Israeli Conflict – Prof. McGee
Class #: – 42057 – Tu – 3:10pm-5:50pm – PH 156 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Students will take on the roles of Israeli, Palestinian, Arab and American negotiators in this semester long simulation. The current moment is full of crisis and challenge for you, “negotiators”, as you convene for a series of secret meetings that you hope will lead  to a final peace accord between your two people; the Israelis and the Palestinians. Will you be able to jump start the process? Might you succeed where others have failed? This course  is part of the award winning “America and the Middle East: Clash of Civilizations or  Meeting of Minds” series of courses.

History 295 – Sephardic Jewish History – Prof. Bregoli
Class #: 42067 – Tu, Th – 10:45am-12:00pm – PH 157 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
This course introduces students to Sephardi history and culture in the early modern and modern period. We will begin with an overview of Jewish life in the Iberian Peninsula and the events leading to mass conversions and expulsions in Spain and Portugal in the 15th century. We will explore the creation of new communities and identities in Europe, the Ottoman Empire, and the New World in the aftermath of the 1942 expulsion, with special emphasis on the Sephardi communities in North  Africa and the Ottoman Empire, modern political forms, the Holocaust and migrations. We will conclude with a brief section on contemporary Sephardi.

History 392W – Italy and the Jews – Prof. Bregoli
Class #: 42071 – Tu – 3:10-5:50pm – PH 231 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
This course focuses on the history of the Jews in Italy from the early Middle Ages to the
modern period. Although Italian Jews have always been a tiny fraction of world Jewry,
their achievements are great. Highly integrated and engaged in the culture of their times, Italian Jews are quintessentially acculturated and at home both in the Jewish and in the Italian world. How does the particular case of Italian Jewry illuminate the broader Jewish experience?  The course will pay attention to the specificities of Italian Jewry by concentrating on interactions between Jews and non-Jews within the broader context of Italian history. We will consider topics such as Jews in Roman times, medieval Jewish society, Jewish intellectual life during the Renaissance, the Ghettos, Italian Jewish art, the Jews and the Risorgimento, Italian anti-Semitism, Jews under Fascism, WWII and its aftermath.

HEBREW

HEBREW – BASIC LANGUAGE COURSES

Hebrew 101: Elementary Hebrew I – Staff
Class #: 42868 – Tu, Th – 10:05am-11:55am – QH 270F – 4 hr., 4 cr.
A beginner’s course in modern Hebrew.

Hebrew 203 – Intermediate Hebrew I – Staff
Class #: 42890 – Tu, Th – 12:15pm-1:30pm – QH 270F– 3 hr., 3 cr.
Prereq.: Hebrew 102 or equivalent. A continuation of Hebrew 102.

HEBREW – COURSES IN ENGLISH

Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit. in Translation – Prof. Lewis
Class #: 42899 – Tu, Th – 1:40-2:55pm – QH 265C– 3 hr., 3 cr.
Readings in modern Hebrew literature in translation.

Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit. in Translation – Prof. Gruber
Class #: 42901 – Mo, We – 9:15am-10:30am – QH 345C – 3 hr., 3 cr.
See above description.

Hebrew 150: Modern Hebrew Lit. in Translation – Prof. Gruber
Class #: 42902– Mo, We – 10:45am-12:00pm – QH 345C – 3 hr., 3 cr.
See above description.

HEBREW – ADVANCED LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE COURSES

Hebrew 352: Modern Hebrew Lit: 1880-1947 – Prof. Lewis
Class #: 42892 – Tu, Th – 12:15pm-1:30pm – QH 265H – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Study of a theme or of a significant author or group of authors selected from Hebrew prose or poetry [since the beginning of the 19th century] from the late 1800s up to the creation of the state of Israel.

ENGLISH

English 153W: Intro to the Bible – Prof. Shippee
Class #: 34499– Mo – 6:30pm-9:20pm – RA 106 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Selected books of the Old Testament in English translation. Cannot be taken for credit if student has taken English 381.

PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy 116 – Intro to Philosophy of Religion – Prof. Doukhan
Class #: 33659– Mo, We – 4:45pm-6:00pm – PH 152– 3 hr., 3 cr.
A philosophical examination of basic concepts in religion such as God, religious meaning, faith, and religious experience. Readings will be selected from classical and contemporary sources.

Philosophy 261: Adv. Problems in Philosophy of Religion – Prof. O’Connor
Class #: 42064 – Tu, Th – 9:15am-10:30am – KY 281- 3 hr., 3 cr.
An examination of some of the major problems in contemporary religious thought.  Possible topics: the existence of God, the nature of faith; mysticism; the problem of evil; philosophical aspects of eschatology; the impact of science on religion. May be repeated once for credit provided the topics is different. Not recommended for students who have not taken Phil 116.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political Science 240: Contemporary Middle East – Prof. Flamhaft
Class #: 25384 – Tu, Th – 10:45am-12:00pm – PH 121 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
A survey of Middle Eastern governments, political processes, and political group behavior.

Political Science 260: The Middle East in World Politics – Prof. Petaludis
Class #: 25434 – Sat – 1:00pm-3:40pm – PH 245– 3 hr., 3 cr.
The expansion of the European State system into the Middle East and the regional
adjustments. The changing patterns of regional and international politics in the  Middle East, contrasting the League of Nations and the United Nations systems.

SPANISH

Spanish 51: Hispanic Jewish Literature in Translation – Prof. Glickman
Class #: 42231 – Tu, Th – 10:45am-12:00pm – QH 260 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Introduction to Hispanic-Jewish fiction and critical material (Latin American, Brazilian
and Spanish, Sephardic and Ashkenazic). Students will learn to read, discuss and write
about texts in fulfillment of the norms of literature as a discipline, including techniques
of close reading. Stylistic analysis of formal features and literary genres and periods.
Students will learn to read novels, short stories, plays and diaries and analyze literary
and cultural models that seek to define identity.

 

THE FOLLOWING IS A LISTING OF COURSES ON BROAD THEMES AND TOPICS, WHICH EITHER CONTAINS A JEWISH COMPONENT IN THE FORMAL SYLLABUS OR WHICH ALLOW YOU TO DO PAPERS AND ASSIGNMENTS ON JEWISH-RELATED ISSUES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE COURSE. THESE COURSES WILL COUNT FOR THE JEWISH STUDIES MAJOR AND MINOR IF STUDENTS DO JEWISH STUDIES-RELATED WORK IN THE COURSE.

THE 100 LEVEL COURSES ARE LISTED AS ELECTIVES ONLY AND DO NOT COUNT TOWARD THE JEWISH STUDIES MAJOR.

HISTORY

History 285: History of the City of New York – Prof. Davis-Kram
Class #: 42062 – Mo, We – 10:45am-12:00pm – RZ 109 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Jewish Studies students could choose any area of NYS during a particular period/decade and explore the lives of Jews in that time and place/city/town. Another option would be a  biographical study of a Jewish individual or family during one time and place. Examples  are: the Jewish immigrants to Dutch New Amsterdam; Jewish families and their  involvement in the American Revolution, Jews in the development of particular areas of the state , industries in which Jews were active in NY State, Jews elected to political office  in NYS, Jewish immigrant communities in a city or town along the Hudson River –  e.g. Kingston, Poughkeepsie, Albany. Prof. Davis-Kram generally does not allow students to  use NY City for this course since she teaches two courses on NYC in which those topics are  more useful.  (Please confirm with Prof. Davis-Kram if you are taking this course as part of the Jewish Studies Major or Minor). (US)

PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy 104: Intro to Ethics – Prof. Doukhan
Class #: 33642 – Tu, Th – 4 :45pm-6 :00pm – 3 hr., 3 cr.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political Science 102: Current Political Controversies: Religion & Politics – Prof.
O’Hara
Class #: 25365 – Mo, We – 9:15am-10:30am – RA 210 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
This course introduces students to the basic analytical and evaluative tools of political
science through an examination of particular controversies. Each section will focus on a
current controversy such as life and death (abortion, the death penalty, etc.), minority rights  (affirmative action, homosexual marriage, etc.), and religion and politics, and then explore the wider and more general issues it entails.

SOCIOLOGY

Sociology 211: Ethnic and Racial Relations – Prof. Young
Class #: 41500 – Mo, We – 10:45am-12:00pm – KY 427 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
Major ethnic and racial groups, ethnic contact, and ethic relations in  American society and in other cultures. Prereq.: Sociology 101

Sociology 211: Ethnic and Racial Relations – Prof. Sperry
Class #: 41501 – Mo, We – 3:10pm-4:25pm – KY 319 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
See above description.

Sociology 221: Sociology of Religion – Prof. Cho
Class #: 41552– Tu, Th – 3:10pm-4:25pm – KY 427 – 3 hr., 3 cr.
The nature of religion, its relationship to other institutions, and its changing role
and function in modern society.

Sociology 289: Sociology of Death & Dying – Prof. Heilman
Class #: 41656 – Tu, Th – 10:45am-12:00 pm – PH 117– 3 hr., 3 cr.
This course focuses on attitudes toward death, funeral practices in various cultures, the cultural components of mourning, and the social organization of death and dying in
Bureaucratic settings such as the hospital and nursing home. The course will include
Practices and customs associated with the Jewish death and dying.

Sociology prerequisites may be waived after a consultation with Prof. Heilman.

Available course descriptions are provided. Please contact the individual department or professor for additional course information.